Journals

I subscribe to a number of journals.

New England Journal of Medicine

The FDA Amendments Act of 2007 — Assessing Its Effects a Decade Later
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 379, Issue 12, Page 1097-1099, September 2018.
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Adolescents’ Use of “Pod Mod” E-Cigarettes — Urgent Concerns
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 379, Issue 12, Page 1099-1102, September 2018.
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The CMS Proposal to Reform Office-Visit Payments
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 379, Issue 12, Page 1102-1104, September 2018.
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Doctoring while Sick — Is Living with Cancer Making Me a Better or Worse Doctor?
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 379, Issue 12, Page 1104-1105, September 2018.
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Heart

Heartbeat: improving outcomes after myocardial infarction
Primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) dramatically improves clinical outcomes compared with unreperfused STEMI. However, acute restoration of myocardial blood flow to infarcted tissue may cause further damage, with reperfusion injury accounting for up to 50% of infarct size. To date, therapeutic interventions to reduce reperfusion injury that appeared promising in experimental models have not been shown to improve clinical outcomes in patients. In this issue of Heart, Engstrøm and colleagues report the extent of myocardial salvage, as assessed by MRI, in 243 patients with STEMI randomised to danegaptide versus placebo.1 Danegaptide in a dipeptide that interacts with connexin-43, resulting in increased gap junction conductance which has been shown to reduce infarct size in animal reperfusion studies. Unfortunately, the myocardial salvage index was no different in patients receiving two different does of danegaptide compared with the control group and there was no...
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Dual antiplatelet therapy in the 'real world
Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin and an oral P2Y12 inhibitor is a successful strategy for preventing recurrent ischaemic events following acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Clopidogrel was previously the P2Y12 inhibitor of choice but interpatient heterogeneity in levels of achieved platelet inhibition and delayed onset of action limit its efficacy. Consequently, the more potent P2Y12 inhibitors prasugrel and ticagrelor have been compared with clopidogrel in randomised controlled trials (RCT) of patients with ACS. In Trial to Assess Improvement in Therapeutic Outcomes by Optimizing Platelet Inhibition with Prasugrel-Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TRITON-TIMI) 38, prasugrel significantly reduced recurrent ischaemic events in moderate to high risk patients managed with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) but increased major bleeding. In PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes  (PLATO), ticagrelor significantly reduced rates of vascular death, myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke at 12 months, without increasing overall major or fatal bleeding but with more non-coronary artery bypass grafting-related bleeding. Given their...
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JACC

JACC Instructions for Authors
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2017 AHA/ACC/HRS Guideline for Management of Patients With Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society
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Cardiovascular Outcomes After Lower Extremity Endovascular or Surgical Revascularization: The EUCLID Trial
AbstractBackground Lower extremity revascularization (LER) is a common treatment in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), but long-term outcomes are poorly defined. Objectives The aim was to analyze LER in the EUCLID (Examining Use of tiCagreLor In paD) trial to determine predictors and cardiovascular outcomes. Methods Patients were grouped according to whether they received a post-randomization LER (n = 1,738) or not (n = 12,147). All variables were assessed for significance in univariable and parsimonious multivariable models. The primary endpoint was myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or cardiovascular death; major adverse limb events (MALE) included acute limb ischemia or major amputation. Results A post-randomization LER occurred in 12.5% of patients and was an endovascular LER in 74.7%. Endovascular LERs were performed more often in North America, whereas surgical procedures occurred more frequently in Europe. Independent factors predicting LER were prior and type of prior LER, geographic region, limb symptoms, diabetes, and smoking. A post-randomization LER was associated with an increased risk for the primary endpoint (hazard ratio: 1.60; 95% confidence interval: 1.35 to 1.90; p < 0.0001) and MALE (hazard ratio: 12.0; 95% confidence interval: 9.47 to 15.30; p < 0.0001). Event rates for the primary endpoint after LER were numerically higher in the surgical subgroup, but MALE were similar between surgical and endovascular LER. Conclusions In the EUCLID trial, LER was most often endovascular. Following LER, there was an increased hazard for the primary endpoint (with higher event rates in the surgical group) and a markedly increased risk for MALE events (with similar event rates between surgical and endovascular LER procedures). (A Study Comparing Cardiovascular Effects of Ticagrelor and Clopidogrel in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease [EUCLID]; NCT01732822)
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The Future Is Determined Now
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Heart Rhythm