Journals

I subscribe to a number of journals.

New England Journal of Medicine

Blood Donation by Gay and Bisexual Men — The Need for a Policy Update
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 385, Issue 17, Page 1537-1539, October 2021.
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“All Labor Has Dignity” — The Case for Wage Equity for Essential Health Care Workers
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 385, Issue 17, Page 1539-1542, October 2021.
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Peak Moments — When Kindergarten Is High Risk
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 385, Issue 17, Page 1543-1545, October 2021.
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A Randomized, Controlled Trial of the Pan-PPAR Agonist Lanifibranor in NASH
New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 385, Issue 17, Page 1547-1558, October 2021.
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Heart

Heartbeat: sex-related inequities versus differences in management and outcomes of patients with cardiovascular disease
Sex differences in clinical management and outcomes of patients with cardiovascular disease sometimes are due to healthcare inequities (which should be eliminated) but also might be due to sex-related differences in aetiology and pathophysiology. For example, the optimal medical dose for management of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) may be lower in women compared with men. In a study of 561 women and 615 men with a new diagnosis of either HRrEF or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), Bots and colleagues1 found that although 79% of women and 86% of men with HFrEF were prescribed an ACE inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), the average dose was only about 50% of the recommended target dose for both sexes. A lower ACEI/ARB dose was associated with higher survival outcomes in women, but not men, with HFrEF. In patients of both sexes with HFpEF, there...
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Coronary artery calcium paradox and physical activity
Reducing the risk of plaque rupture events in individuals without a prior myocardial infarction is an imprecise science. To help clarify whether there is evidence of coronary artery disease and avoid ‘medicalisation’ of otherwise healthy individuals, international guidelines recommend incorporating the measurement of coronary artery calcium alongside risk prediction models.1 Coronary artery calcium serves as a surrogate marker of advanced calcified atherosclerosis and can be calculated from a non-contrast ECG-gated CT scan where a score of 1–99 Agatston units represents subclinical atherosclerosis, and a score of 100 or more Agatston units is considered an appropriate threshold for initiating medical therapy.1 At ≥100 Agatston units, the burden of advanced calcified atherosclerosis justifies statin implementation and this has been validated in a real-world cohort study of 16 996 subjects with a 10-year number needed to treat to prevent one cardiovascular event of 12.2 Many clinicians have...
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JACC

Heart Rhythm